Your Child NEEDS the HPV Vaccine: 13 Reasons Why the CDC Is Right

May 26, 2017

By Jennifer Margulis, Ph.D.

(We are reposting this piece by Dr. Margulis, because (a) it’s awesome and (b) our site can handle more traffic than hers.)

Does your child need the HPV vaccine to protect her against the human papillomavirus?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say a resounding “Yes!”

Your child NEEDS the HPV/Gardasil vaccine.

Gardasil is recommended by the CDC for all children between the ages of 11 and 12 years old.

Your child will need two shots, given six to twelve months apart.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a group of over 150 viruses. Some types can cause genital warts. Others can lead to cervical and other kinds of cancer.

You don’t want your precious baby to get genital warts, do you?

You don’t want your kid to die from cancer, do you?

You’re not a heartless baby killer, after all. Or are you?

C’mon, this vaccine is a no-brainer. In fact, anyone who even considers telling a parent that there are pros and cons to the HPV vaccine is committing a “hanging offense,” to borrow a turn of phrase from the Boston Herald’s Rachelle Cohen. (We loved your editorial, by the way. Thumbs up, Rachelle!)

And, since we seem to be going into the business of hanging medical freedom and children’s health advocates, perhaps we ought also to hang any parents who choose to forgo the HPV vaccine?

And while, we’re at it, how about the children who say, “No, thank you,” to the HPV vaccine themselves? We could hang them too.

In case what you’ve already read is not enough to convince you that your child NEEDS the HPV vaccine RIGHT NOW WITH NO FURTHER DELAY, here are 13 more reasons the CDC is right and your child should get the Gardasil vaccine.

 

13 Reasons Why The CDC is Right and Your Child Needs the HPV Vaccine

 

  1. You don’t care that the HPV vaccine program was halted in Japan.

The Japanese government stopped giving the Gardasil vaccine in 2013 after health officials recorded nearly 2,000 adverse reactions, according to the Tokyo Times.

Too bad, so sad.

Who cares?

What do the Japanese know, anyway?

Ah, right. Japanese health authorities recognized that the whole-cell pertussis vaccine was causing brain damage in healthy children and introduced a safer and equally as effective vaccine in 1981, a full SIXTEEN YEARS before American health officials paid real attention and recommended an acellular vaccine for widespread use in the United States…

 

  1. The side effects of the HPV vaccine don’t concern you.

Reported side effects from the Gardasil vaccine include fainting, seizures, brain damage, paralysis, speech problems, short-term memory loss, pancreatitis, and even death. But what’s a little death compared to preventing cervical cancer?

 

  1. You don’t give two hoots about Shazel Zaman, the 13-year-old girl who started vomiting immediately following vaccination.

Shazel Zaman was so dizzy and had such a severe headache that she ended up in the hospital.

Shazel Zaman died five days after receiving the HPV vaccine at Derby High School in England.

Just another unfortunate coincidence!

 

  1. It doesn’t bother you that there’s a UK Association of HPV Vaccine Injured Daughters.

The thousands of parents who belong to this non-profit, the parents who followed their doctor’s orders and got the “cervical cancer jab,” as they like to call it in the U.K.? Whatever! They’re ALL full of baloney and making things up. Every single one of them. And so is every family interviewed for this article in The Independent…

 

  1. It doesn’t bother you that there’s an Irish parent support group called R.E.G.R.E.T.

They’ve got almost 15,500 followers on their Facebook page, thousands of whom are the parents of tweens and teens who have had severe side effects post-HPV vaccination, including joint and muscle pain, chronic headaches, and chronic fatigue. Ah, the luck of the Irish. They’re all full of baloney and making things up. Every single one of them. (See #4.) And who cares that the well known, well respected, definitely-not-a-hysteric Irish philanthropist Jonathan Irwin has just stepped down as the CEO of The Jack & Jill Children’s Foundation because of his daughter’s lack of mobility, back pain, headaches, nausea, and ill health since Gardasil vaccination (as he tweeted on May 3 and explains in this recent interview)?

 

  1. You’re not interested in the Danish documentary film that details the severe adverse events following the HPV vaccine experienced by young women in Denmark.

Hmmm. There seems to be a global pattern here, of severe adverse reactions. Yeah, right. So what that hundreds of thousands of families around the world are experiencing the SAME PROBLEMS post HPV vaccination? We give MILLIONS OF DOSES of this vaccine. And all the families interviewed in this film? Probably full of baloney and making things up (see #3, #4, and #5). Because, of course, Danes are known for their dishonesty.

 

  1. You’ve never heard of Dr. Diane Harper.

The MIT and Stanford educated medical doctor who also has a Master’s Degree in Public Health? The one who is a vaccine developer and has worked for Merck, the manufacturers of the Gardasil vaccine? Dr. Harper has repeatedly spoken out against the HPV vaccine and raised serious concerns about whether it is safe. As reported by CBS News in 2009:

Amid questions about the safety of the HPV vaccine Gardasil one of the lead researchers for the Merck drug is speaking out about its risks, benefits and aggressive marketing.

Dr. Diane Harper says young girls and their parents should receive more complete warnings before receiving the vaccine to prevent cervical cancer. Dr. Harper helped design and carry out the Phase II and Phase III safety and effectiveness studies to get Gardasil approved, and authored many of the published, scholarly papers about it. She has been a paid speaker and consultant to Merck. It’s highly unusual for a researcher to publicly criticize a medicine or vaccine she helped get approved.

Dr. Harper joins a number of consumer watchdogs, vaccine safety advocates, and parents who question the vaccine’s risk-versus-benefit profile. She says data available for Gardasil shows that it lasts five years; there is no data showing that it remains effective beyond five years. 

[Our emphasis. Text highlighted in bold is the part you should ignore.]

 

  1. You don’t believe in or practice preventative medicine. Not for yourself. Not for your kids.

Pap tests detect the presence of HPV. If pre-cancer HPV is detected, most kinds can be easily treated. According to the American Cancer Society:

A well-proven way to prevent cervical cancer is to have testing (screening) to find pre-cancers before they can turn into invasive cancer. The Pap test (or Pap smear) and the human papilloma virus (HPV) test are used for this. If a pre-cancer is found it can be treated, stopping cervical cancer before it really starts. Most invasive cervical cancers are found in women who have not had regular Pap tests.

Since your kid isn’t going to go for that preventative medicine and pap smear nonsense, you’ll be first in line at the doctor’s office to have her get the HPV vaccine.

 

  1. You’ve never heard of the microbiome.

HPV is a common virus, which nearly 80 million Americans carry in our bodies. Our bodies, incidentally, are full of microbes—bacteria and viruses that live in us and on us. These microbes play a crucial part in our health and our immunity, as scientists have recently uncovered. There’s more we don’t know about how we live in symbiosis with microbes. But you’ve never heard of the microbiome and you’re not keeping up with the current science. Germs will be germs. It’s never crossed your mind that there may be benefits to cohabitating with viruses and bacteria and that wiping out a virus we have co-evolved to live with may not actually be a good idea. Bring on the vaccine. (And the severe auto-immune reactions and primary ovarian failure that sometimes go along with it.)

 

  1. You don’t believe the CDC when they point out that most people with HPV never develop ANY symptoms or health problems.

Since you think it seems like a fabulicious idea to vaccinate against a virus over 80 million of us carry (see #9), who cares that HPV is also harmless in the vast majority of cases? Bring on the unnecessary vaccines! And let’s develop one for the common cold while we’re at it.

 

  1. You don’t care that HPV will not cause cancer on its own and that most HPV infections (9 out of 10) go away by themselves within two years.

Turns out that HPV doesn’t cause cancer on its own, at least according to this international team of distinguished researchers …

Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary but not sufficient for the development of cervical cancer. The factors promoting persistence as well those triggering carcinogenic pathways are incompletely understood,” according to peer-reviewed science anyway.

And we know that at least 90 percent of HPV infections clear up by themselves and never cause any health concerns (see #10)? So OF COURSE we should vaccinate! Because vaccines are safe, effective, and oh so necessary. Always. Except when they’re not.

 

  1. You believe doctors should promote vaccines for children after being wined and dined by the pharmaceutical companies that manufacture and profit from the vaccines.

Chances are your doctor has not ever read a vaccine insert. Your doctor received almost no training on safety, efficacy, or necessity of vaccines in medical school. So your doctor does not know that the HPV vaccine contains, among other things, a known endocrine disruptor thought to cause bowel disease as well as infertility in some mammals—oopsie! (polysorbate 80); a known neurotoxin (aluminum); and a substance that is in pesticides and banned for food use by the FDA (sodium borate). So you called Merck to find out why a banned substance was being injected into our children and they referred you to their legal department. Which did not return your call. Ah well.

Your doctor has PROBABLY never looked up the ingredients in the HPV vaccine that your child needs, which are, according to the CDC: “vitamins, amino acids, mineral salts, carbohydrates, amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate, sodium chloride, L-histidine, polysorbate 80, sodium borate, yeast protein.”

But we can pretty much GUARANTEE that your doctor has gotten a free lunch, free swag, and perhaps even an all-expenses-paid trip from pharmaceutical representatives eager to sing the praises of their latest and greatest vaccines.

 

  1. You think your child should make medical decisions, especially decisions about vaccines, behind your back. 

This is the messaging given to teens—“Just don’t tell your parents!” And you’re all for it. Because, of course, your youngsters should be making medical decisions about everything—vaccines, psychotropic drugs, birth control, abortion, antibiotics, ADHD medication—without telling you or talking to you first.

Say what?

A few months ago an unidentified public health nurse* went into Ashland High School an unidentified school to give a talk to the freshman biology class about infectious diseases. During that talk she told the freshman biology students—14 and 15-year-olds—to “please, please, please get the HPV vaccine,” and not to tell their parents.

Because the HPV virus is very scary. She even showed them pictures.

After she instructed the freshmen not to tell their parents she realized—oh, my!—she had made a mistake.

So she added the words, “Just kidding.”

[*This nurse’s identity is well known in our community, but the aforementioned unidentified high school refused to release her name when baffled parents repeatedly asked for confirmation, choosing to refer to her only as “the speaker.” Because we live in a small town and this nurse’s behavior was inexcusable, even reprehensible, to so many people who live here, we have chosen not to print it here.]

She was representing AshlandChild. Note there is no name or contact information on AshlandChild’s website. This website poses as a site that is “supporting the immunization conversation.” Except the public health nurse in question actually told me that she has no interest in having a conversation with people who are “intractable” (translation: anyone who does not wholeheartedly agree with her. That is, with all of the CDC’s vaccine recommendations).

AshlandChild is interested in “supporting” one conversation, however. A monologue in an echo chamber. That monologue is how best to get every child to have every vaccine on the CDC schedule, regardless of that child’s genetic vulnerabilities, individualized medical needs, or risk of exposure to said infectious diseases. Because, as we have convincingly shown you by now, your child NEEDS the HPV vaccine.

The purpose of AshlandChild is to “remove barriers” to vaccination.

In the case of teenagers, the “barriers” that need to be removed? Thoughtful, well educated parents. Remove ’em or lynch ’em. Take your pick.

List of reported reactions to vaccines from the British newspaper The Independent, includes over 8,200 side effects from HPV vaccine

Screenshot from The Independent

 

This post is not designed to and does not provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, treatment, or services to you, your child, or to any other individual. General information is provided here for educational purposes only.

Related posts:

13 Reasons Why the CDC is RIGHT and You Should Vaccinate Your Kids

Are Vaccines Safe? To Vaccinate or Not? These 60 Experts Weigh In

Do Vaccines and Tylenol Cause Autism? One Family’s Story

 

Jennifer Margulis, Ph.D., is an award-winning journalist, Fulbright grantee, and a champion of children’s health. She is the author/editor of seven nonfiction books, including Your Baby, Your Way: Taking Charge of Your Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Parenting Decisions for a Happier, Healthier Family and (with Paul Thomas, M.D.) The Vaccine-Friendly Plan: Dr. Paul’s Safe and Effective Approach to Immunity and Health, From Pregnancy Through Your Child’s Teen Years. Her articles have been published in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and on the cover of Smithsonian magazine. She has taught literature in inner city Atlanta; appeared live on prime-time TV in France; and worked on a child survival campaign in West Africa. Learn more about her research on vaccines in Ty Bollinger’s mini-series, The Truth About Vaccines (you need to give your first name and email to sign up). Follow her on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

For more by Jennifer Margulis, click here.

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17 Responses to Your Child NEEDS the HPV Vaccine: 13 Reasons Why the CDC Is Right

  1. Jesus baby says:

    As for the dent the vaccine may make, a mainstream study to determine whether an HPV vaccine would be “cost effective” approximated that the vaccine might be able to save 1300 lives over the course of these children’s lives.”

    You mean this 14 year old paper?

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2873748/

    In Indonesia it’s estimated instead of 1300 lives saved, it’s over 19,000.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27490258

    • ProfessorTMR says:

      That’s Indonesia. Lives saved in Indonesia is simply not an argument for HPV vaccines in developed countries. My vaccinating or not vaccinating my children against HPV is going to have zero effect on lives lost due to cervical cancer in Indonesia.

      By the way, Indonesia could save the majority of those lives as easily by instituting regular Pap tests (which, by the way, are still necessary for someone who receives the vaccine).

      • Jesus baby says:

        If saving 1300 US or over 19,000 Indonesian women per year doesn’t sway you, how about 420,000 in 179 countries?

        http://www.who.int/immunization/cost_effectiveness_of_human_papillomavirus.pdf

        And when it comes to HPV vaccination, it’s not you deciding not to vaccinate your children that’s the issue. It’s putting articles like this on the web that discourage others from vaccinating theirs.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        Again, those lives could as easily be saved by the practice of Pap tests, which carry NO risks of long-term immune system damage and those death rates will in no way be affected by whether or not the average American 11 or 12-year-old gets this vaccine.

        And, frankly, I don’t care in the least whether it bothers YOU that we post articles filled with TRUTH about the actual risks vs. benefits of vaccination of any type. Our mission is to help people stay healthy, and we believe in giving them accurate information in order to do so. If you wish to start a website where you can extol the possible benefits of HPV vaccines while ignoring all the risks, by all means do so. But given our assessment of the risks vs. benefits of this vaccine in an industrialized society, we are perfectly happy to DISCOURAGE PEOPLE FROM USING THIS VACCINE.

        Edited to add, I’m a little bemused by the idea that you think that statistics about Indonesia should “sway me” from providing accurate information about the risks to the population that this vaccine is currently being pushed upon. Personally, I find it disgusting that you would use completely inapplicable statistics to bolster your argument for vaccinating kids in industrialized countries.

      • Jesus baby says:

        Again, those lives could as easily be saved by the practice of Pap tests…

        Pap smears only have a sensitivity of about 50%. Even if done perfectly, processed correctly, read by experienced pathologists, in conjunction with a well coordinated office staff that can contact patients r.e. results and appropriate follow-up, about 20% of cases are still fatal.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        According to Dr. Diane Harper who was responsible for Gardasil clinical trials:

        “• No population benefit in reduction of cervical cancer incidence in the United States with HPV vaccination as long as screening continues.
        • Incidence rate of cervical cancer in the United States based on screening is 7/100,000 women per year.
        • Incidence rate of cervical cancer if women are only vaccinated with Gardasil is 14/100,000 per year (twice the rate of cervical cancer if young women vaccinated with Gardasil do not seek Pap testing at 21 years and the rest of their life).
        • Incidence rate of cervical cancer with Cervarix vaccination is 9/100,000 per year— better than with Gardasil, but still more than with screening alone.
        • Incidence of cervical cancer without screening and without vaccination is nearly 90/100,000 per year. The combination of HPV vaccine and screening in the U.S. will not decrease the incidence of cervical cancer to any measurable degree at the population level. Those women who do not participate in Pap screening, and who are vaccinated, will have some personal benefit for five years for Gardasil and 7.4 years for Cervarix (maybe longer), but they will not affect the population rates.”

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marcia-g-yerman/an-interview-with-dr-dian_b_405472.html

        Seems to me the “benefits” of HPV vaccine in a highly screened population are negligible for the average person and the population as a whole. They certainly don’t justify any form of coercion. You want to get the vaccine? Fine. I will defend your right to do so, but I will continue to “discourage others” as often as I can.

      • Jesus baby says:

        Diane Harper was the principle investigator at one site in a Gardasil trial, and hasn’t been the lead author of any randomized Gardasil trial. She’s entitled to her opinions but that’s all they are.

        No one is recommending HPV vaccination alone to prevent cervical cancer.

        The combination of HPV vaccine and screening in the U.S. will not decrease the incidence of cervical cancer to any measurable degree at the population level.

        Based on what evidence?

        And did you know a little over 5% of all cancers worldwide are caused by HPV? Not just cervical, but anal, anal canal, penile, vulvar, head & neck and vaginal?

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        She was involved in Phase 2 AND 3 trials, and the mainstream media seemed to think she was perfectly qualified to discuss the facts on what was known about Gardasil as a result of those trials. YOU are entitled to your opinions, but that’s all they are. Diane Harper? Hers carry a hell of a lot more weight.

        Ask Diane Harper what evidence she based that on. I can’t speak for her.

        The 5% would hardly be shocking since cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women in the developing world. Here there were approximately 1,685,210 cancers diagnosed in 2016, approximately 31,500 (only 63% of which were types contained in the Gardasil vaccine) of them were due to HPV according to the CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/hpv/statistics/cases.htm, that’s only 1.9%, and I suspect the CDC is estimating high. It’s strikes me as highly unlikely that 70% of oropharynx cancers are caused by HPV. Most of those cancers take a very long time to develop as well, and for the ones that are caused by HPV, whether or not long-term pervasive infection happens is highly dependent upon lifestyle factors.

        Nice try. Again, if the vaccine seems at all worthwhile to YOU, by all means have at it, but don’t be surprised if others come up with a different calculation. And if you happen to react badly, like so many others and end up needing to recover from the effects, we’ll be here to help.

      • Jesus baby says:

        I didn’t know you put so much stock in the mainstream media’s opinions.

        If I ever run into Diane I’ll be sure to ask her how she determined that vaccinating against the virus that causes the vast majority of cervical cancer wouldn’t decrease the incidence of cervical cancer, and I’d ask her if she knew what incidence meant.

        I didn’t say the US incidence of HPV-related cancer was over 5% – I said worldwide. But what is it about even preventing 31,500 cases just in the US every yearthat isn’t getting through to you?

        And for decades we thought head & neck cancer was mostly due to smoking and drinking, but now we know it’s mostly due to HPV, especially HPV-16.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        I don’t put much stock in mainstream media’s opinions. That comment was for you. 😉

        I suspect that, yes, someone Merck has doing clinical trials does actually know what incidence means.

        And obviously I KNOW you said the incidence was worldwide or I wouldn’t have said you were using statistics from the rest of the world to justify vaccination HERE.

        What is it about “preventing 31,500 cases just in the US every year” that isn’t “getting through” to me? How about the fact that there is absolutely no indication that all 31,500 of supposedly HPV-related cancers would, or even could, be prevented by Gardasil or Cervarix? As I noted, many of those cancers are not caused by HPV strains covered by Gardasil or Cervarix in the first place. (And, by the way, the most common cervical cancer strains in African American women are not in them, either. But we don’t hear that unpleasant little fact often, do we?) We are already seeing signs that we are simply replacing the strains that are in the vaccine with other strains that aren’t and may be even more virulent. And we don’t “know” that head and neck cancers are mostly due to HPV. They don’t routinely screen the cancers for HPV. It’s a guess, and a mighty convenient one for an industry determined to convince people that HPV vaccines are God’s gift to creation.

        Now I’m going to ask you, what is it about the disabling (if not killing) of many previously athletic young people all over the world in the hopes of staving off a disease that might have developed 30+ years from now, and is generally relatively easy to treat if it did, that isn’t getting through to you?

  2. Jesus baby says:

    Because over 4000 annual deaths from cervical cancer in the US alone is like nothing.

    • ProfessorTMR says:

      Oh, no. It’s not nothing, but that doesn’t make it something that HPV vaccines will make a serious dent in. As a matter of fact, the vaccine GAVE a young woman I know a very serious case of cervical cancer when she was given it during the trials. Fortunately, she stopped taking mainstream doctors’ advice because she is alive and well today, which is something they didn’t think possible.

      As for the dent the vaccine may make, a mainstream study to determine whether an HPV vaccine would be “cost effective” approximated that the vaccine might be able to save 1300 lives over the course of these children’s lives. Let’s assume that’s about 60 years, so 60 years of vaccinating (and re-vaccinating because all vaccine-induced immunity wanes) would save 1300 of the projected 24,000 lives lost to cervical cancer, or about 0.5%. The study authors determined that would make the vaccine “cost effective,” but they forgot to count in one HUGE cost, the lives of the active young girls (and now boys) that are being destroyed in our zeal to save those 1300.

      As always, the argument is far more nuanced than you are led to believe.

  3. Hans Litten says:

    http://yournewswire.com/cia-agents-hired-to-troll-alternative-media-comments-online/

    CIA Agents To Troll Alternative Media Sites In Huge Propaganda Program

  4. Hans Litten says:

    Wonderful article Jennifer .
    One criticism , is the use of UK statistics . You cannot believe any government statistics coming out of the Crimino-UK .

    Bernard D’Albergue should get a mention for his momentous quote alone .
    As should Dr Sin Hang Lee (a great man).

  5. Terri says:

    Spot on. Anyone who cares about children – ALL children, not just your own – must take a good hard look at the issue of vaccines and question everything.

  6. John Min says:

    Whew! I thought thinking moms had lost their collective minds when I saw the headline and was going to ban you from my inbox after reading your story. I am so glad my initial reaction was so wrong. A beautifully written piece that outlines the madness of vaccines, the HPV vaccine especially. There is NO WAY I will ever let my daughter receive this shot and shame on all the MD’s that promote the lies and propaganda and never give truthful informed consent. Way to go Thinking Moms!

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