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47 Responses to Contact Us

  1. Monica S says:

    Hi,
    I am a new mom and was wondering if anyone knew of a list of non-vaccine pushing pediatric doctors in the San Jose, CA area. I have not been able to find one who doesnt push me to vaccinate. My son is now 3 weeks old and I need to get him his first check up.
    Any suggestions/referrals would be appreciated.
    Thank you!

    • Lajos Palánki says:

      Please read this it is important. Just vaccinate him. In our area a child died in meningitis because he was not vaccinated. Now the school he went to is closed off and everyone is freaked out. Vaccination does not cause autism. It is a big fat lie spread by ignorant people. Autism is mainly caused by genetic errors (which can not be caused by vaccines). If your child is not autistic he will not be unless a terrible accident happens (God save us from that). It has no dangers (maybe he will get a fever for one or two days but nothing else), but it might save your child’s life when a polio/pox/etc. outbreak happens. Please consider this option and if you think that I am sincere and not a corporate scum please spread the word.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        Lajos, it doesn’t matter whether you are sincere or a “corporate scum.” You are wrong.

        The child you know who died of meningitis did not die “because he was not vaccinated.” He died because he had meningitis. Every vaccine has failures. There is no way to know whether the child would have died if he had been vaccinated. It happens. In addition, while dangerous, invasive meningococcal disease is very rare and rarely contagious as well, while the bacteria that causes it is relatively common. Whether or not a child gets ill from it has more to do with the child’s overall health than anything else. In addition, meningococcal vaccines have a serious adverse event rate of 1 or more percent depending on the brand. That means that if every child were vaccinated, there would be many more hospitalizations from the vaccines than there are from the disease.

        And autism is not “mainly caused by genetic errors.” It is due to a complex interaction between mostly common genetic tendencies and environmental insults as virtually every recent study has determined. And, yes, vaccines (as well as other environmental factors) CAN cause de novo genetic mutations, but more importantly they can affect genetic expression. Autism is characterized by inflammation, with inflammatory genes “turned on.” The immune activation generated by vaccination, especially when the brain is developing rapidly, can most certainly cause that.

        I suggest that you read the new book The Environmental and Genetic Causes of Autism by James Lyons-Weiler. Lyons-Weiler painstakingly gathers all the available science on the subject so you can see for yourself.

        And, excuse me, but when over $3 billion has been awarded to families dealing with profound disabilities (and/or death) as a result of vaccine injury, you have tremendous nerve telling anyone “It has no dangers.” That is a patent falsehood, and it is inexcusable.

      • Lajos Palánki says:

        For ProfessorTMR:

        Vaccination as I understand it has almost no dangers (as I know it it has very low complication chance). And yes the child died because he had meningitis, but he got it because he did not have the vaccination and since then others have got into hospital because they do not have the vaccination. And just to be fair I know autism can develop but it has a higher chance developing due to social conditions than because of vaccination. And I don’t know what kind of professor you are but I think that citation is irrelevant as it as I know does not say anything about the relation between autism and vaccines, however http://www.jpeds.com/article/S0022-3476(13)00144-3/pdf?ext=.pdf, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X14006367, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18180424, http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?isbn=030909237X show that there is absolutely no correlation between the two. So I ask you why you say that there is a relation. And please cite the place where $3 billion is said to be awarded to families who suffered negative consequences, because I have not been able to find it, but I found that out of 2,532,428,541 vaccinations 3,658 claims were filed and 2,301 were deemed compensate-able. That is 0.00014% of vaccinations (calculating including the dismissed reports). So I ask you is it safe? Yeah it can be said so I think. Data from:https://www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation/data/statisticsreport.pdf and if you want to get to know what complications to look out during vaccinations: https://www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation/vaccineinjurytable.pdf . Thank you for reading this and have a good day.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        Just saying that “vaccination has almost no dangers” doesn’t make it so, unfortunately. This link is to a table of just the LEGALLY ACCEPTED injuries. https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/42/300aa-14 There are many more that are not listed because they weren’t discovered in clinical trials and were not followed up on but must be reported in vaccine inserts. You should read some. FACT: vaccination is not “safe” for at least SOME people. There is good evidence that the risk is additive with multiple vaccines, if not multiplicative. There are a subset of children for whom they are very dangerous indeed.

        Autism does not develop “because of social conditions,” period. That theory was demolished long ago. Autism is not due to “refrigerator mothers.”

        There are plenty of studies that will TELL you they determined “there is absolutely no relation between the two,” but only ONE ingredient and ONE specific vaccine has EVER been studied with regard to autism. How then, can one make the blanket statement from those studies that “vaccines don’t cause autism”? One can’t, unless one is deliberately being misleading. NO ONE has carried out a large-scale study comparing the health outcomes of fully vaccinated children vs. completely unvaccinated children. Why is that, do you think? And why is that when small-scale ones from independent researchers are published, pressure is put on the journals to withdraw them?

        As you can see from page 9 of the following link, total awards to petitioners comes to nearly $3.3 billion. https://www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation/data/statisticsreport.pdf You might be interested in this article by independent journalist Sharyl Attkisson (formerly of CBS News): https://sharylattkisson.com/govt-wipes-recent-vaccine-injury-data-from-website/

        There is general consensus that vaccine adverse events are severely under-reported much less compensated. But while we’re talking about compensated claims, did you know that more than 80 cases of autism have been verified to have been compensated, and the full total is likely to be more than 500?

        You sound like a reasonable human being, though you clearly didn’t read through all those research papers that, no, don’t state “vaccines cause autism” but, yes, do conclude things like Thimerosal (contained in a number of childhood vaccines in “trace amounts” and in flu vaccines in whopping amounts) cause neurological problems in developing brains, or maternal immune activation (like that which can result from vaccination) causes autism in laboratory animals. In other words, the more you know about autism, and the more you know about vaccines, the more you know those papers are a damning body of evidence. It has been all laid out for you in James Lyons-Weiler’s new book. Please read it.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        If it’s not clear from the previous comment the reason I say “there is a relation” is because I have read mountains of studies (on both sides) and talked to thousands of people, doctors, parents, adults with autism, etc. From all my discussions with parents, I have put together a LOT of information about autism and how it manifests that informs my reading of the science. In addition, my engineeing background in signal processing informs my understanding of how to increase or decrease “noise” in order to reveal or mask a signal. The epidemiological studies that “prove” “vaccines don’t cause autism” almost all seem deliberately designed to HIDE a signal if it exists, rather than to reveal one. It’s no surprise then that they mostly succeed.

      • Lajos Palánki says:

        I think this was only a misunderstanding so to make this clear I would highlight my thoughts about the topic. I really think that vaccination is important and if there is a risk then we should take it. I am saying this because diseases such as smallpox were eradicated with the help of them and measles were reduced to a memory, but movements like this which encouraged the rejection of vaccines made measles get back. Of course I don’t support all vaccines. For example the flu shot is in my opinion a decision where it is good to say no (because it is a guess whether this or that type will be dominant). But there are some diseases that I think need to be eradicated and the only way we can do that is by vaccination and if we stop halfway then diseases like measles and meningitis will come back. I think it is not a right to say no to vaccinations against diseases like these as there are people who cannot get the vaccine because of their medical condition, and if everyone is vaccinated except them they have drastically decreased rates of getting infected.

        About autism. I have a close relative who lived her life looking after autistic kids (educating them, improving their abilities). I don’t know if this is just some weird coincidence but she never seen a kid who have started showing autistic behavior after being vaccinated (she knows these things as she needs to record details like this from parents). And unfortunately being a scientific person I believe in facts and the research studies I have seen were saying there is no relation between autism and vaccination. So I thought where all this is coming from and found a 1998 article proving the relation between the two which later was proven to be a false research with the data made up and the writer had his medical degree taken away. The other studies I found wasn’t convincing to the look and I would need additional time to process these researches, but until that I remain skeptical and say that even if there is a risk it should be taken (and this may sound cliché) for the good of mankind.

        Note:I have seen people with autism both severe and mild and I say that though it is a tragedy if vaccines do make people autistic but in my opinion the risk must be taken.
        Note_no2: I am not proven to be suffering from autism but I indeed have hard time talking to new people, I can’t bear eye contact and have very few connections and I think having a really really mild case of autism did not influence my life and if it was caused by vaccines then let it be, if I had the choice knowing that my social skills would be damaged I would take it, but of course people should have free will and can chose the other option, but in my opinion it is not ethical not to vaccinate your children because they can start epidemics and can infect people who did not have the right to choose, but that last part is only philosophy so in science it can be ignored.

        I will try to widen my knowledge about the topic, but I don’t think it will change this opinion. Anyways I just wanted to share this, I really hope you understand why I say these things and I hope that you can understand why I am saying these things. Also totally unrelated to medical topics but here is a great book dealing with ethics it is After Virtue by Alasdair MacIntyre it is interesting and gives a really good description of “good” and “bad”.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        Excellent! You are THINKING! You have made the entirely rational inference that not all vaccines are created equal. And you are RIGHT! Then, of course you go on to say that there are “some diseases that I think need to be eradicated.” Now, I’m certain you can see that this is an OPINION, and it is an opinion that you may or may not share with others (as is your opinion of the flu vaccine). So, let me ask you — who gets to decide which diseases “need to be eradicated” and which do not? (By the way, you cannot eradicate meningitis with vaccination. Meningitis can be caused by many different bacteria and viruses, and there is no way to vaccinate for them all.) You? You haven’t addressed the fact that the meningitis vaccine has a 1% serious adverse event rate (look it up, it’s on the package inserts) for the age range it is recommended for. When New York was in the process of adding this vaccine to their schedule, we did a risk analysis on it and discovered that many more children would be made ill than would be kept from becoming ill if the vaccine were administered to all New York children. That is just not morally defensible. So, if not you, who? What if that person decided you NEED to get a flu shot every year (even though studies are showing that getting them every year lowers even further their abysmal efficacy rate)? Would you still be okay with them deciding? Now you might understand why many people are not okay with ANYONE else making their risk assessments for them.

        And, I’m sorry, but you can’t convince me you are “a scientific type” if you are harking back to Andrew Wakefield’s 1998 paper (co-written with 12 other emininent doctors and scientists at the Royal Free Hospital) with the words “proving the relation between the two” in your sentence. “Scientific types” actually READ the science. If you had, you would know that it says and does nothing of the sort. It’s a case series that points out the possibility of a link between MMR and autism. In fact, it specifically says they did NOT prove a link. The idea of a link between vaccines (it was never simply the MMR) and autism “comes from” the fact that literally thousands of parents have reported vaccine-related encephalopathy reactions that led directly to a decline in skills. I don’t know when your friend was practicing, but I think it’s highly unlikely that either people were being honest with her or that she was listening to parents, because I DON’T work with autistic kids, but I’ve personally spoken to hundreds of parents with very similar stories.It is supported by many, many research papers on the effects that vaccines and their ingredients have on the neuroimmune system.

        And, I’m sorry, it is NOT acceptable to sacrifice even ONE child to severe autism (or any other debilitating vaccine-related condition such as intractable seizures), much less than the huge number we are doing so with today’s vaccine schedule. You would know this if you personally were bearing the horrific cost in terms of money, time, and energy for the many therapies required to make life livable. You would know it if it were YOUR child who lived with intractable pain, who could not relate to another human being, who would never learn to use the bathroom, who could not go a day without a debilitating seizure, who is trapped inside without any other way to express what is going on that bizarre and often quite aggressive behaviors. You’re probably also not aware that while the rates of severe autism are rising dramatically, rates of “lesser” neurological conditions such as ADHD are also rising dramatically, making it unlikely that in the not-too-distant future we will not be able to have a standing military.

      • Lajos Palánki says:

        About hiding the signal: You may be right but -and this is very harsh- it is better to have a million people vaccinated from which (statistically) with a very generous guess (backed by the data I provided) 20-50 backfires and causes problems to those people affected than to have an epidemic that kills a hundred-thousand people. Of course that is an extreme scenario, but I think it represents well how problematic this scenario is. On one hand no epidemic, but random people get drawback for something they were pushed into socially, but on the other hand it is hard to ignore the deaths caused by the epidemic. I think we are responsible for things we could have done but did not because we chose that path so I think it is better to chose the social pressure than the rejecting path. (The problem with this is that it is really Kant like as it tries to set up a general rule and does not include the narratives detailed in After Virtue, but unfortunately this is still the best representation)

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        I’m sorry, Lajos, but such “harshness” is entirely unjustified. First of all, vaccine damage is not limited to “20-50 backfires” as you claim. It is RAMPANT. Secondly, EVERYBODY counts or NOBODY counts. If it is okay with you to sacrifice YOUR child in order to lower by a minuscule amount the already ridiculously low possibility that someone else’s child will get measles, that is YOUR prerogative, but as many have pointed out, I should not be required to set myself on fire in order to keep you warm. It is quite possible to determine which children are most susceptible to which types of vaccine injury (again, read James’s book). We have no justification whatsoever for a failure to do so.

        And the facts are that we do not have (and have not had) such an epidemic in a very long time. So forcing EVERYONE to take ANY of our current vaccines cannot be justified on the basis of such an argument, especially in industrialized countries with modern plumbing and sanitation. The “benefits” you propose for forced vaccination simply do not exist.

      • Lajos Palánki says:

        And to me it doesn’t make any sense. Why would the be selling vaccines if the treatment is infinitely more costly. If you are selling pills that remove bad smell for $1 then you won’t be selling pills for $0.01 that prevent bad smell for 1 week. It is just bad buisness. Maybe it is something i am not getting here that creates a wall between our opinions.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        Personally, I think most of the insurance industry is brainwashed to believe that what the pharmaceutical industry says about vaccines is true, but it doesn’t matter. In any event, surely you must realize that if the population is chronically ill, there is a tremendous amount of money to be made in pharmaceutical treatments, hospital visits, devices such as inhalers and EpiPens, etc., etc., etc. And these expensive treatments guarantee continued need for insurance companies to pay for them. There is simply no corporate motive whatsoever to discontinue even one small portion of the vaccine schedule.

      • Lajos Palánki says:

        So what is the alternative you are proposing? Because if you don’t vaccinate your children others who can not get the vaccine can have a significantly increased risk of getting the disease thus dying. If you don’t vaccinate it is not only your suffers negative consequences, but others as well. I think you are responsible for those people. If an outbreak happens because 10% did not vaccinate then the lets say 10000 people died because you and the other 10%. Lastly let me ask you a question: What is your profession which makes you the authorization to post things like those you post. Also I think you are all in a big fat confirmation bias here which is a great academic offense.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        Have to go take my car in. I’ll answer this when I get back.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        Okay, in your second sentence you make a few errors. First, if I don’t vaccinate my children, others “who can not get the vaccine” DON’T have a significantly increased risk of getting the disease.” Firstly, because the majority of things we vaccinate for are not circulating. Do vaccines have something to do with that? Almost definitely, but so do a number of other factors such as proper sanitation and plumbing and an understanding of how contagious disease spreads in the first place. My not vaccinating my children isn’t suddenly going to ADD viruses and bacteria to our environment.

        Second, do you have any idea how few people are in that “can not get the vaccine” category as far as the CDC is concerned? It is essentially limited to people actively ON chemo (still rarish in childhood, thank God), and people with primary immune deficiencies (some of which are triggered by vaccination, by the way, but that’s another discussion…). Those people are certainly at risk, but they are at risk all the time from ANY sort of illness, including colds, flu, or stomach viruses. Their risk of catching some illness does not rise significantly if I don’t vaccinate my children. It rises if they themselves, or the people around them are not actively cautious about ANY illness. For instance, were you aware that people who were vaccinated with the acellular pertussis vaccine can be asymptomatic pertussis carriers? That means that if they got pertussis (which is among the “deadlier” diseases we vaccinate for), they would be MUCH more likely to spread it to people they know than someone who had not been vaccinated for it and was aware they harbored an infection. It is not incumbent upon society at large to eradicate any possibility of encounter with infectious illness for people whose immune systems are not working, nor is it possible to do so. It is my responsibility to keep sick children home so that they do not infect others, but beyond that life entails risk. My children both got chickenpox. I kept them home at the first sign of illness, and there wasn’t a single other case in either of their schools, despite chickenpox being highly contagious. (By the way, they got the chickenpox because I got shingles. Shingles was much more rare before everyone started getting vaccinated for chickenpox. Now even children are getting shingles. Chickenpox cannot be “eradicated” for this reason.) Contrast that with the mumps outbreaks on college campuses where it is affecting mostly people who have had two doses of vaccine already.

        Next, you assume that I am responsible for the possibility that someone who would never have made it past childhood in years past dies, despite the fact that they are at risk at all times, but you are completely uninterested in the fact that people die from vaccine reactions. You even essentially said, “Hey, that’s the risk I’m willing to take.” It’s NOT a risk I’m willing to take. If I am responsible for people with compromised immune systems who die of some infectious disease, then YOU are responsible for the people who die because they received a vaccine they were “required” to have in order to attend school. While immediate death doesn’t happen often, the triggering of illnesses that makes death more likely happens FREQUENTLY. For instance, BEFORE the first (ineffective) measles vaccine was licensed approximately 400 people died of measles-related conditions. In the same year, 4000 died from asthma (and that is STILL true despite the advent of expensive “controller medicines). The closest thing ever done to a large vaccinated vs. unvaccinated study found that the vaccinated kids got asthma 14 times more often than the unvaccinated kids. I developed asthma shortly after receiving a mumps vaccine. My younger brother and I, numbers 7 & 8 in a family of 8 kids, were the first kids to get asthma. My cousin who is the same age and lived with us when we were small ALSO has asthma. If I am “responsible” for people who die of infectious disease (certain to be far less than 400, let alone 4000), are you “responsible” for the fact that approximately 1 in 10 children have chronic trouble BREATHING without powerful drugs? The death of an immunocompromised person from infectious disease may or may not be avoidable, but death or lifetime risk from vaccine injury is most certainly avoidable.

        There is no outbreak of anything in industrialized countries that would kill 10,000 people. If there were, then the discussion might be different. That cannot be an argument for any of the vaccines we “require” today.

        The “alternative” I propose is to allow everyone to make their own healthcare decisions. At the very least to provide truly informed consent. Find out who is most at risk of vaccine injury and let them know BEFORE you pierce their skin with a needle, much less 5 at once, as is common today. Will that lead to an increase in infectious disease? Perhaps. But it may also lead to people trying to figure out how to actually keep themselves healthy rather than assuming that forcing others to make themselves sick will do it for them.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        I forgot about the second half of your post.

        What is my profession? I’m a writer with a strong science background (Physics degree and work experience as an electrical engineer and IT professional), but that is entirely beside the point when it comes to “authorization” to post the things I post. The truth is true, no matter what my “profession” is. You are welcome to do all the research I have done on this subject. I invite everyone to do so daily. If you do, then YOU will have the authority to discuss the topic as well. This website gets people coming here frequently to “school” us on the facts only to get the most basic things wrong. For instance, they say “they took the Thimerosal out of the MMR long ago!” when, as a live-virus vaccine. the MMR never contained Thimerosal. Or they say what you said, that people are not vaccinating because of a case series of 12 children published in 1998 that only mentioned ONE vaccine, the lead author of which specifically recommended that people go back to using the single vaccines (that were then removed from the market). That is straight up bullshit and easily refuted. And I did so specifically in this blog: http://thinkingmomsrevolution.com/andrew-wakefield-and-jenny-mccarthy-made-me-do-it-is-a-big-fat-lie/

        It’s interesting that you mention confirmation bias as “a great academic offense.” It isn’t really. It’s completely understandable and happens ALL the time. As I say often, we are ALL biased. The thing is to be aware of our biases and try to mitigate them. Now as far as this subject is concerned, are there some people who are subject to confirmation bias? Certainly. There are people who see conspiracies behind every bush and don’t believe that anything we’re “told” is true. Is that true of all or even most of the people who are choosing not to vaccinate? Hell, no. The vast majority of them BELIEVED in vaccines and only stopped vaccinating when their children got sick, usually much sicker than anyone in a previous generation of their family. Then, when they stopped vaccinating “just in case” (or because they did a whole lot of research and discovered that “serious adverse events” are MUCH more common than they were being told), their children started to get better (especially if they shared treatment information with other so-called “anti-vaxxers”), and then their completely unvaccinated children were far healthier than the vaccinated ones. Anecdotal? You bet. But powerful evidence for the family itself. Add that to the thousands of other such “anecdotes” that we can now share easily because of the Internet and suddenly you have good evidence of a pattern which should INFORM inquiry, not turn it off. The very fact that inquiry is shut down so thoroughly on this subject means that, yes, people are operating with confirmation bias, your “great academic offense,” but the majority of it isn’t on this side of the fence.

      • Lajos Palánki says:

        Firstly most vaccines don’t add germs into the environment (e.g. the vaccine against meningitis does not even contain any part of the germ at all). Secondly as a physicist I assume you know basic graph theory. The whole infection system can be modeled with it and if the edges are possible infections (Between people who are not vaccinated and one of them contains the disease and have a general like 1% of transmission chance) then the total chance of catching a disease does actually depend on how many edges there are thus how many people are vaccinated.

        About chickenpox. I am not from the USA. In my country we do not vaccinate for chickenpox the same reason what you have described.

        Lastly I think that it is not your job to say that vaccination is bad and is dangerous. I personally have never met anyone who had a bad reaction from receiving a vaccine. But that doesn’t mean they are safe. The many research and testing does. My problem with this whole movement is that you say things like vaccines contain aluminum and yes it is true (I found a post on your blog claiming them to be toxic) but it is a biological fact that they are not toxic (From Wikipedia:”Aluminium salts are remarkably nontoxic….”), so my question is why do you claim that they are toxic, and what supports your claims.

        Also there was again a misunderstanding. I asked for an alternative to protect the people who are not able to get the vaccine. Because living in a society takes away freedom whether you like it or not.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        I’m not sure I understand what point you’re making in your first paragraph. Are you implying that transmission rates for infectious disease are ONLY dependent upon vaccination rates? Of course, vaccination rates do affect transmission of infectious diseases. However, they are by no means the only thing that matters. For instance, uptake of the measles vaccine is very high in the United States with most regions having 95% or more children vaccinated, but no one says that it is not easily transmitted to others who are susceptible, whether they have been vaccinated or not. (We saw that in the Disneyland outbreak where the majority of cases were in previously vaccinated adults.) Uptake of meningococcal vaccines, however, in the United States is still quite low, yet the CDC itself says that 98% of the (few) cases that do happen occur “spontaneously.” The fact is that meningitis is not now, nor has it ever been, a truly “contagious” illness. In fact, one of the documents from the CDC that unfortunately I can’t find again stated that a large percentage of children gain immunity before adulthood without ever having been ill.

        So, with respect to chickenpox, since your country does NOT mandate it for what you consider to be reasonable and rational reasons, do I surmise correctly that you agree that the CDC should not determine vaccine policy for EVERYONE? The CDC recommends a significant number of vaccines that states then turn around and require young people to get without any good rationale beyond “the CDC recommends it.” If the CDC is not going to be honest about the risks (and they’re not, that much is clear), then YOU may not consider if “my job” to advise people of the risks, but I certainly DO think that it is incumbent upon me to share what I have learned with others like you have not the time or the inclination to do the research for yourselves. For instance, have you read any of those vaccine trials that you assume “mean they are safe”? I suspect not, or you would know that for the most parts the number of subjects is small, they are followed for only short periods after the vaccine is administered, and people are dropped from the trials if there is even a hint of an adverse reaction. But the very worst thing about those trials that are used to establish “safety” is that the control groups are not given true placebos in almost any of them (for instance in the Gardasil trials ONE trial on a small group of teenagers used a saline placebo, the rest did not). You can’t establish that something is “safe” if you are comparing it to something that is NOT safe, such as, yes, injected aluminum salts. And, I’m sorry, are you seriously quoting Wikipedia as an authority on the safety of injected aluminum and passing it off as “a biological fact”??? Personally, I base my knowledge on the scientific literature. There is SO much material on the dangers of aluminum, especially injected aluminum, that I don’t even know where to begin. Every article on this site is extensively sourced; read just a few of the articles on aluminum and you may get some idea of the level of deception in any claims as to the safety of injected aluminum: http://vaccinepapers.org/ You might also want to seek out the work of Christopher Exley in the U.K. who has spent his career researching the effects of aluminum on the body.

        The only practical “alternative” for protecting the people “who are not able to get the vaccine” is for them to stay home or assume that they are subjecting themselves to risk when they leave their homes. “Living in a society,” means they are at risk every time they leave their homes, and they always will be no matter how many vaccines we develop or how many people have received them. It does not make logical or moral sense to make OTHERS living in a society assume health risks to protect the very small number of people who are not in fact “protectable.”

      • Lajos Palánki says:

        Also this is an MMR vaccine description containing all side effects and it not once contains any mention to autism where you said vaccine packagings and descriptions does include it.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        I did not in actual fact say that any particular package insert includes autism as a side effect on the package insert, though there is at least one DTaP vaccine that has.

        Did you happen to read this section?

        “Nervous System
        Encephalitis; encephalopathy; measles inclusion body encephalitis (MIBE) (see
        CONTRAINDICATIONS); subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE); Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS);
        acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM); transverse myelitis; febrile convulsions; afebrile
        convulsions or seizures; ataxia; polyneuritis; polyneuropathy; ocular palsies; paresthesia.
        Encephalitis and encephalopathy have been reported approximately once for every 3 million doses of
        M-M-R II or measles-, mumps-, and rubella-containing vaccine administered since licensure of these
        vaccines.”

        It is, of course, not obvious to you because you don’t talk to the parents of children who regressed following MMR, but the incidence of encephalopathy, brain inflammation, is far higher than is quoted in this insert, and is usually the triggering event for autistic regression. The cases that were compensated by the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program followed brain injuries that were frequently diagnosed as encephalitis or encephalopathy. The insert makes it seem like this happens at lower rates than would happen from measles infection, but that is simply not true. Few people had ever heard of autism or even encephalopathy before the measles vaccine was introduced in 1963, even though we had about 3-4 million measles cases a year in the United States. If encephalopathy happened at the same sort of rate, which is possible I suppose but unlikely, it was most often happening to children who were older than 12-15 months (the age at which we give the first dose of the MMR) and whose brains were far more developed and better able to bounce back. This is probably why the rates of long-term neurological sequelae from measles infection were so low before the advent of the vaccine.

      • Lajos Palánki says:

        Sorry forgot to include the document so here it is http://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/m/mmr_ii/mmr_ii_pi.pdf

      • Lajos Palánki says:

        So you pointed me to vaccinepapers.org and I found this: “Injected aluminum adjuvant can be MORE harmful than ingested (ionic) aluminum. Nanoparticles are often more toxic than bulk or soluble forms of the same substance.” The problem here is the use of words can, and often. It is assuming things and it is generalizing things. I found no experiment that were done. Also another thing I looked into: your anecdotes. Did you know that autism is not always the lack in language development and the sudden loss in social skills you mostly say is because vaccines is actually just an event that would have happened anyhow.

        Also have you heard about herd immunity? Whatever you say (because I found posts denying it) it is real it is just basic graph and probability theory.

        And sorry for wasting each others time because as I said earlier we both have confirmation bias and what happens when we hear an other side of the argument which is mostly the fact and is right? We ignore it and it just increases our affinity for the idea.

        Also as I know you created Autism One too or you administrate it or at least related to it. http://www.realclearscience.com/blog/2016/11/28/the_worst_websites_for_science_in_2016.html This I thinks sums up the “science” of this website.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        Oh, Lord. I’m starting to be sorry I’ve wasted so much time on you. Read ALL the science on aluminum. It is extremely damning.

        And my “anecdotes”? What anecdotes? Are you talking about the people whose children were compensated for brain injuries who developed autism? Those are not “anecdotes.” Those are facts. They had brain injuries and developed autism and the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (a highly hostile procedure) conceded that YES their injuries were caused by vaccines. And what does this mean: “Did you know that autism is not always the lack in language development and the sudden loss in social skills you mostly say is because vaccines is actually just an event that would have happened anyhow.” Are you saying that “autism would have happened anyway” in the kids who regressed? If so, you have ZERO evidence to base that on. If you are saying that some cases of autism do not involve regression, then of course I knew that. I talk to people with autistic kids all day long, remember? Some children have autism from birth, which of course does not mean that there was not a prenatal toxic exposure that “caused” the autism.

        Have I heard about “herd immunity”? Are you fucking kidding me? Seriously, dude. How many times have I told you I’VE READ THE SCIENCE. I can guarantee you that I know much more about “herd immunity” than you do, including the origin of the idea (which had nothing to do with vaccination). Herd immunity does not apply to a rare illness for which 98% of cases are “spontaneous” like meningitis. Vaccination doesn’t mean the bacteria that causes the illness no longer exists. It just means that the person receiving the vaccine might not get ill from it. The only immunity that matters is your own. (While we’re on the subject of herd immunity, did you know that the vaccines for both pertussis and polio that are currently used in the United States do not prevent infection and transmission of the diseases, so don’t contribute to herd immunity? Both vaccines are merely intended to prevent symptoms.)

        And, no, I didn’t “create AutismOne” or “administrate it.” That would be Ed and Teri Arranga. I have led a panel on puberty and autism as well as one on blogging. Does that mean that I or this organization agree with everything that is presented at AutismOne? Of course not. Does that mean that “real clear science” blogger has a clue about the real value of what they are presenting, either? Fuck no. If you’re offering up science bloggers, ANY science bloggers, on the “truth” of autism science, then you really are stuck in your confirmation bias. I haven’t read a science blogger that wasn’t more concerned with their credentials in the “Skeptic” community than they were with the truth yet. So, this is our last conversation. Good day to you.

      • Lajos Palánki says:

        Sorry but I think I need to tell you this before going.

        Facts =/= stories. The fact is that what polio or measles did the last century is far worse than the autism vaccines “cause” (which is not a fact as no scientific journal, article nor study confirms it) .

        And for polio there are two types of vaccines the IPV and the OPV both used to prevent polio from transmitting and not to prevent the symptoms so I doubt you read the science.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        You’re still assuming I’m an idiot, thanks, despite the fact that I’ve given you a good number of “facts” you didn’t know and corrected ones you thought you DID know. I’m well aware of what both “facts” and “stories” are, thanks. What YOU seem to be unaware of is that “anecdotal” observations from parents are unquantified data. Any scientist worth their salt would be looking for patterns in the huge quantity of data we have gathered.

        There are MANY studies that “confirm” the vaccine autism/link. You have just dismissed them without reading them. There is nothing in the least scientific about that.

        And as for measles, in the United States there were only 400 deaths from measles in the year BEFORE the first vaccine was licensed. That’s fewer kids than die every year from drowning, often in their own backyard pool. The mortality rate from measles had already dropped precipitously, just as it did in other infectious diseases, many of which did not have vaccines. Yes, measles has continued to be deadly for many children in third-world countries who are malnourished, but if they were well-fed, had access to clean water, and sanitation services, that would probably shift dramatically. Now we are taking lot of unhealthy children and giving them autism and other neurological disorders in an effort to keep them from getting measles, while they still don’t have access to food, water, and sanitation. Yay, us.

        And as for polio, did you know that 95% of polio infections are no worse than a cold? Did you also know that paralytic polio was largely unknown until the 20th century? What caused a relatively harmless virus to suddenly become so much more virulent? Chances are really good that one or more ENVIRONMENTAL components were involved, such as the tremendous amount of DDT sprayed near the public pools where the polio “outbreaks” nearly always began. (Research the effect of DDT on the CNS.) Did you know that the Cutter version of the first vaccine gave children polio? Oops! The virus wasn’t quite killed after all! Did you know that millions and millions of doses were given that were contaminated with a monkey virus known to cause certain types of cancer? Did you also know that the formal definition of paralytic polio was changed drastically just after the vaccine was issued and many cases of “paralytic polio” were just renamed? Those are all “facts” for you. And, yes, I know there are two types of polio vaccines. Did YOU know that the oral polio vaccine is not given in the United States anymore because the only cases of paralytic polio in this country in decades were from vaccine-strain viruses? And, no, the current version of IPV does NOT prevent transmission of polio, so I KNOW you don’t read the science.

  2. Melyssa Dickow says:

    Hi,

    My name is Melyssa and I work with Dr. Kellyann. You may have heard of her from her appearances on the Dr. Oz show and as the author of Living Paleo for Dummies.

    Anyway, I am reaching out to select bloggers like yourself, who share the same audience as Dr. Kellyann, to let you know about her upcoming book titled “Bone Broth Diet”.

    We’d love for you to take a look at the book (I can send you a free copy) and if you’re willing, do a review of it.

    Here’s the cool part: we have upcoming articles in Huffington Post and similar name brand publications. We’ll be quoting reviewers in them, which means there’s a chance your review will be quoted and linked to on those articles.

    Also, Dr. Kellyann has over 100,000 Facebook fans and 30,000 Twitter followers. If you are willing to post up a review by the end of the year we’d be happy to blast it out to our followers also.

    Please let me know what you think and if this is something you’d be interested in doing.

    Thanks!

    Melyssa Dickow

    Social Media Assistant

  3. Mindy Gould says:

    I thought you might be interested in reading this.

    Science researchers at Livingston High School are jumping into the debate over genetically modified food, integrating the science learned in the classroom with global social policy.

    Many major crops, soy, corn, cotton, and more recently salmon, are a result of genetic modifications that would never occur in nature, according to the students who have spent considerable time researching topics related to genetically modified organisms or GMOs.

    On Monday night Dec. 21 they’ve been invited to join Dr. Shiva Ayyadurai, an American scientist with a PhD in systems biology from MIT – and Livingston High School graduate – when he challenges an agribusiness giant to prove it is working with safety assessment standards for its GMO soybeans and other products.

    Scientists have long been altering the genes of food crops, to boost food production and to make crops more pest-, drought- and cold-resistant. Critics, however, say the claims of those benefits are overblown. And, they argue, there is still no scientific consensus on the long-term safety of these foods.

    The young science researchers at LHS recently looked at the issue, emerging as experts on genetic alteration, specifically “formaldehyde detoxification in maize.”

    Last May, the contributions of Phoebe Konecky, Rachael Olovyannikov, Zachary Zamore, and Cori Kollen were included in the literature review of a scientific research paper in “Agricultural Sciences” by Dr. Ayyadurai’s research team at International Center for Integrative Systems. (Read more about their work by clicking HERE).

    Ayyadurai (LHS ’81) and the Livingston Education Foundation (LEF) planted the seeds of this collaboration when Dr. Ayyadurai was recognized in the LHS Hall of Fame for his achievements as a scientist, inventor and entrepreneur.

    Dr. Ayyadurai’s team presented a series of peer-reviewed scientific papers to demonstrate, using systems biology and bioinformatics, that genetic engineering of soy disrupts normal plant metabolism resulting in accumulation formaldehyde (a known carcinogen) and depletion of glutathione (a powerful anti-oxidant).

    The conclusion of the research asserted the need for testing the predictions, and the need for standards for GMO safety assessment.

    “The fact is there are no standards for GMO safety assessment,” Dr. Ayyadurai said. “This important conclusion has not been presented clearly in the mainstream media, neither by the pro- or anti-GMO
side. The current ‘standards’ are self-reporting akin to you or I creating our own standards for emission testing of our car, and simply informing the DMV that the car is safe. This is precisely what is happening with GMOs.”

    Dr. Ayyadurai suggests that more testing is needed to determine the effects of genetic modification on plants and the resulting impact on human health. And he has since challenged the giant Monsanto Corp. to disprove his findings, saying he’ll turn over a building he owns in Cambridge, Mass., that’s valued at $10 million.

    At the forum on Dec. 21, he and his colleagues, including our LHS students, will share what they have learned through their research on GMOs. 
Science Supervisor Brian Carey will lead questions and answers. The event will take place in the school auditorium at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 21 and is open to the public.

    • ProfessorTMR says:

      Holy crap! You bet we’re interested. Do you know any way we can get in touch with these students?

      • Phoebe Konecky, Zachary Zamore and Rachael Olovyannikov says:

        Hello,
        We are the students and just came across this post. Let us know if you still have questions.

      • ProfessorTMR says:

        Hi, Phoebe, Zachary, and Rachael! Let me congratulate you on what you have already done. I would LOVE for one or more of you to write us a blog summarizing your experiences. We want very much to get young people involved in these sorts of questions. Your example would be fantastic! You can contact me on Facebook as Zoey O’Toole. I will email you as well.

  4. Wendy says:

    Hello,
    Our son goes to Kindergarten soon. I am not completely opposed to vaccines, but seeking a pediatrician or family practice physician in Collier County (Naples, FL) who will treat and see non-vaccinated kids (with religious exemption).
    I want to be able to choose what vaccines and the schedule of receiving them. It’s of course also important to have a doctor who is a great listener, accommodating staff and easy to see without long waits. Thanks for sharing your experiences.
    -Wendy

  5. Wendy says:

    Hello,
    Our son goes to Kindergarten soon. I am not completely opposed to vaccines, but seeking a pediatrician or family practice physician in Collier County (Naples, FL) who will treat and see non-vaccinated kids (with religious exemption).
    I want to be able to choose what vaccines and the schedule of receiving them. It’s of course also important to have a doctor who is a great listener, accommodating staff and easy to see without long waits. Thanks for sharing your experiences or knowledge.
    -Wendy

  6. Karen Miller says:

    I submitted a blog to you recently on featureme but have not received any acknowledgement or response. I think you are the same people. Thank you

    • ProfessorTMR says:

      Hi Karen, our apologies. Being vastly underpaid (in other words, mostly NOT paid), we’re not the most organized group on the face of the earth. The mechanism between submission on the site and getting it onto the blog can be anything but straightforward. I recently received a group of blogs that I have not had a chance to go through yet. AutismOne is taking all our efforts at the moment. I will get to you shortly. Thanks for submitting. We appreciate it, even if we don’t show it very well!

  7. Luka says:

    The best way to start treating your kids by far is Andrew Cutler’s chelation method. It is slow, safe and have fantastic results. Good place to start is to join
    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/FightAutismandWin/info
    Many moms there are sharing their successes. You can ask question and have GREAT support from very knowledgeable moms. And YES you CAN recover your kids and have NT kid again. It takes time but is is possible.
    Good luck.

  8. Kimberly Mohammed says:

    Hello, fellow Thinkers and Revolutionaries! I read your book when it was first released, and I love it! I run a special needs support group, and I added your book to our lending library so others could enjoy it too. Your book inspired me so much that I wrote a book of my own all about my son’s experience with autism and the treatments we used that helped him move from the severe to the mild end of the spectrum. I would love to see my book reach a large audience so hopefully more people can be inspired to help their children get started on their own healing journeys. Thanks for all you do!

    http://www.lulu.com/shop/kimberly-mohammed/reclaiming-kazi/paperback/product-21887924.html

  9. Nadine says:

    I think your website is sexist, even if it wasn’t intended to be. By calling yourself “THE Thinking Moms” you’re implying that other moms by default don’t think.

    • ProfessorTMR says:

      The title IS sexist, but that has nothing to do with the “the.” That has to do with the fact that it doesn’t include dads. Mothers ARE the driving force behind the revolution, but dads are a big factor, and I, personally, think we need to address that shortly. As far as the “the” in our name, it refers to the revolution that is being driven by thinking moms. It does not in any way imply that mothers who are NOT participating in the revolution are not thinking, it is just a way of characterizing the people who are driving the revolution.

  10. Teresa Owen says:

    I am a mom of a teen girl with Autism and Mitochondrial Myopathy. I started home schooling Angel when the schools were not teaching her, not following her IEP, and not following doctors’ orders. Since being wrongfully removed and pulled off all of her medications, she has went from fourth grade level from being home schooled to low second/ high first grade. We are fighting to get our daughters home. They both have Mitochondrial Myopathy. We have been contacted by FBI and US HHS OCR. I am getting documents together for FBI, US HHS OCR, US Department of Education OCR, and two United Nations offices- Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and Office for High Commissioner for Human Rights.
    I am in contact with many people throughout the US and eight countries. I am Bubblegum Mom on Twitter because I have Mitochondrial Myopathy.

  11. J Suggs says:

    Hi. My 4 year old daughter has been recently diagnosed with autism. We have been making some changes in her diet, and are seeing some results. However, when it comes to therapies, research, and other treatments I feel completely overwhelmed and unsure where to even start. It’s hard to know what is reliable and what is not. I could use any help you could give on where to start and important things to know. I don’t want to let time get away just because I was overwhelmed. Thanks for your help.

  12. Nancy Klein says:

    Hello,

    My name is Nancy and I run the content department here at PhDinspecialEducation.com. My team has just published a really useful resource titled: 101 Noteworthy Sites on Asperger’s and the Autism Spectrum. To view our article follow the link provided: http://phdinspecialeducation.com/autism-aspergers/

    Our mission at PhDinspecialEducation.com is to help educate people on the needs of children and adults enrolled in special needs education classes. We want to share our resource with you because your readers may benefit from it, and we believe it would make great content for your site.

    Feel free to share the list with your readers. I look forward to hearing from you. Thanks and have a wonderful day.

    Regards,

    Nancy Klein
    Content Editor
    PhDinspecialEducation.com
    [email protected]

  13. Sue says:

    Hi,

    I read about your comments about the Arrowsmith program.
    My son just got rejected because of his “autism” diagnosis. It is really not right.
    Where do you go to now for help? Is there something else out there that does what Arrowsmith does that accepts our kids? I am going crazy researching this at the moment..there is some place called “Brain Potential Institute” but don’t know anyone who went through this program. Can anybody offer any type of advice on an excellent program that will help the brain? Thanks….S

  14. Brian says:

    Hi Moms,

    I’ve been following your blog closely. We are now getting treatment in China at the Shanghai Hongci Children’s Hospital. Results has been very encouraging.

    Treatment encompass a multi-factor nutrient transfusion, multisensory integration using auditory intervention and also rTMS (repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation).

    Verbal capabilities increased after the first session, with 6 sessions making up a complete treatment program spread over a period of 4 months.

    I’ll be happy to share any information and anwer any questions you may have.

    Brian

  15. Sue Cranmer says:

    Please consider offering a V-neck ladies Tshirt. My sensitivities will not allow me to wear a crew neck but I would love one of your shirts.

  16. Mary Ashcraft says:

    Is it possible for mw to speak personally with someone from TMR? I have a 21 year old son that we have had a lot of issues with and only in the past two years has ANYBODY every mention Asperger’s Syndrome. I have questions and I don’t know where to turn? Thanks!

  17. Susan Corgan says:

    I’m looking For Your UploadedFiles But Can’t Seem To Find Them… Specifically For The NIH study Showing The Streep Increase In Autism Following WHO’s Vaccine CaMpaign In Non-Industrialized Nations.
    Do You Know The One I’m Talking About?
    It Wa Taken Off Of The NIH SiTe.

    Thanks For All You Do!!!

    Ps. Sorry About The Punctuation. My Phone Is Freaking Out…Again.

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